Navigation

Humanities and Social Sciences: Course Selections

World History I

This course covers World History through the Middle Ages.  The course encourages students to analyze the significant cultural, political, religious, social, and economic movements and events of World History and their role in shaping the intellect and character of the world from the beginning of history to roughly 1250CE. It includes the study of the ancient Middle East, Greece, India, China, Rome, the Byzantine Empire and the early Muslim world and the Middle Ages in Europe and Asia.  In addition to the subject-area content, World History I develops the critical reading, writing, research, geography, and study skills needed in the high school classroom, including the use of primary sources. In addition, students in the course will write both long and short essay assignments and master the use of citations and bibliography, as well as learn to identify reliable sources. Credit:one unit.

World History II

World History II covers World History from the Middle Ages to the present and seeks to build on the foundation laid in World History I. There is a focus on the more recent past including the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, developments in Africa and East Asia, the Americas, and the modern world. World History II encourages students to analyze the significant cultural, political, religious, social, and economic movements and events of World History and their role in shaping the intellect and character of the modern world. The course utilizes primary documents and emphasizes historical analysis, reading, research, and written argumentation building on the foundation set in the World History I course. Credit: one unit. Prerequisite: World History I or equivalent. 

Advanced Placement World History

Advanced Placement World History is equivalent to a college-level world history course that examines the events that make up the world’s history from c. 1200 CE to 2001 consistent with the College Board requirements to prepare students for the Advanced Placement examination. The course encourages students to analyze the significant cultural, political, religious, social, and economic movements and events of World History and their role in shaping the intellect and character of the modern world. AP World History emphasizes the following AP historical thinking skills including developments and processes; sourcing and situation; claims and evidence in sources; contextualization; making connections; and argumentation. The following AP reasoning processes are also essential: comparison, causation, and continuity and change. In addition, the course will move at a faster pace than other World History courses offered and will expect more independent work from students. Credit: one unit. Prerequisite: World History I or equivalent and with teacher recommendation. 

United States History

United States History focuses on the people and events of the United States from the pre-Columbian period to the present. The course encourages students to analyze the significant cultural, political, religious, social, and economic movements and events of the country and how they shaped the United States. Current events are also considered in the light of historical experience. In addition, the course emphasizes the analysis of primary source documents and researching and writing thesis-driven papers. Credit: one unit. Prerequisite: World History I and II or equivalent. 

Advanced Placement United States History

AP United States History is equivalent to a college-level US history course and is consistent with the College Entrance Examination Board requirements to prepare students for the AP examination in United States History.  The course covers the nation’s history from the pre-Columbian era to the present, makes extensive use of primary documents, and emphasizes analysis, argumentation, and writing skills.  The course encourages students to analyze the significant cultural, political, religious, social, and economic movements and events of the country and how they shaped the United States. In addition, the course will move at a faster pace than other US History courses offered and will expect more independent work from students and a focus on the historical thinking skills expected by the College Board. Credit: one unit.  Prerequisite: World History I and II or equivalent.

United States Government

A one-semester course, United States Government is devoted to the practical study of the United States government.  In addition to understanding concepts such as federalism, the three branches of federal government and the separation of powers, checks and balances, and popular sovereignty, the course applies these concepts through research on current events. The course also explores contemporary topics such as media bias and social media’s impact on public opinion. Credit: one-half unit.  Prerequisite: World History I and II.

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics

AP United States Government and Politics is equivalent to a college-level survey of the United States government.  The fundamental principles of the United States government are traced in their evolution through Western civilization to the nation’s founders to today’s political events in the nation’s capital.  The course emphasizes analysis of the U.S. political system and concentrates on teaching students how to understand political events by writing about the principles of political science in the context of United States governmental history. In addition, the course will move at a faster pace than the one-semester Government course and will expect more independent work from students. Credit: one unit.  Prerequisite: World History I and II, U.S. History.

Advanced Placement Comparative Government and Politics

In AP Comparative Government and Politics, students practice the skills used by comparative political scientists by studying data, political writings from different countries, and the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of international settings. Students study six countries in AP Comparative Government and Politics: China, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, and the United Kingdom. Students will show mastery of these skills on the AP Exam by applying concepts, analyzing data, comparing countries, and writing political science arguments. In addition, the course will move at a faster pace than the one-semester Government course and will expect more independent work from students. Credit: one unit. Prerequisite: World History I and II.    Co-requisite: U.S. History.

World Religions

A one-semester course, World Religions gives students an understanding of the fundamental beliefs and practices of the major religions in the modern world: Indigenous Sacred Ways, Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Students are also presented with an overview of the discipline of the study of religion. Credit: one-half unit.

Ethics

A one-semester course, Introduction to Ethics considers some of the most influential ethical schools of thought such as Kantian Ethics, natural law, and utilitarianism to improve the students’ ability to make ethical decisions in a complex world. In addition, the course examines and applies ethical approaches to current events. The course also enhances communication skills, develops character and reasoning skills and written argumentation. Credit: one-half unit

Advanced Placement Psychology

AP Psychology introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatments of psychological disorders, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, evaluate claims and evidence, and effectively communicate ideas. The course prepares students to take the AP Psychology examination. As a college-level course, students will be expected to work independently and at a fast pace. Credit: one unit. Prerequisite: Two units of Humanities and Social Sciences.  Prerequisite or co-requisite: Biology.

Economics

Economics addresses some of the most common and most pressing concerns which humans face. This course will introduce students to the terms, concepts, and assumptions of the social science called Economics, which will help them to understand claims about the state of the economy, economic policy, and many other topics which regularly appear on the news such as taxes, government spending, interest rates, international trade, economic growth, and interest rates. Students will also understand what is at stake in decisions that individuals and corporations make daily. Credit: one-half unit.

Entrepreneurship: New Ventures

This course is designed to be an active class with the learning spaces both on and off campus. Students will delve into new learning including, but not limited to, business modeling, market research, and revenue projections, as well as build skill sets in Google suite proficiency, slide-deck creation, presentations, and idea pitching. Assignments are project-based, and sources will include article reviews from magazines like EntrepreneurInc. Magazine, and Fast Money, as well as podcasts and Ted Talks. Credit: one unit.

2021-2022 Course Offerings